Weekend reads: Stories on SC verdicts, why Gandhis cannot lead opposition and more

Weekend reads: Stories on Supreme Court verdicts, why Gandhis cannot lead opposition and more
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Here are 10 must-read stories from around the globe this Sunday:

• Supreme Court should not only be impartial but seen to be so, writes Swaminathan S. Anklesaria Aiyar in The Sunday Times of India, as four verdicts in a row by the apex court recently have left BJP smiling.

Weekend reads: Stories on Supreme Court verdicts, why Gandhis cannot lead opposition and more

• A temple on contested site of mosque’s destruction departs from judicial counter-majoritarianism, writes Ashutosh Varshney in The Indian Express. "If Hindu consolidation goes further, Muslims will become electorally even more irrelevant. We can’t still be sure this would happen. But even if Hindu electoral consolidation remains at the current level, India’s Muslims would need the judiciary’s counter-majoritarianism to safeguard their interests," he argues.

Weekend reads: Stories on Supreme Court verdicts, why Gandhis cannot lead opposition and more

• Are you Pakistani? Are you a terrorist? The questions Muslim children face at school: Stereotypes about the Muslim community have entered into classrooms and playgrounds, seeping in from the polarising rhetoric prevailing in the larger world of politics, society, mass media and social media, writes Archana Nathan in The Hindu's Sunday Magazine.

• Ties with BJP have been strained. But is that what explains the Shiv Sena going for broke in Maharashtra? Or is it part of the churning within the party, seeking to expand its base and in midst of a generation change, seven years after Bal Thackeray’s death? Indian Express's Vishwas Waghmode, Shubhangi Khapre, Zeeshan Shaikh find out the reasons in a story titled Waiting in the wings: Shiv Sena's new Maharashtra power balance.

Weekend reads: Stories on Supreme Court verdicts, why Gandhis cannot lead opposition and more

• Why the Gandhis cannot lead India’s Opposition, writes Ramachandra Guha in Hindustan Times. "Younger Indians are rightly appalled that the party of the freedom movement believes that only a fifth-generation dynast can lead it. Sonia, Rahul and Priyanka may think they owe it to the Congress to stay in politics. They owe it to the country to go," he argues.

Weekend reads: Stories on Supreme Court verdicts, why Gandhis cannot lead opposition and more

• Kartarpur corridor: a modern miracle, writes Gopalkrishna Gandhi in The Telegraph. He says that the enabling of Indian pilgrims to move four kilometres into Pakistan without visas at this time is an almost unbelievable act of faith.

• 'American horror story': The prison voices you don't hear from having the most to tell us, Melissa Brown writes in Montgomery Advertiser after interviewing more than two dozen inmates in the Alabama correction system, all of whom report extreme routine violence and “unhinged” drug-induced behaviour among some inmates — often against elderly and vulnerable members of the prison population.

• The strange life and mysterious death of a virtuoso coder. Brendan I. Koerner describes the life of Jerold Haas, who was on the brink of blockchain riches until his body was found in the woods of southern Ohio, in The Wired.

Weekend reads: Stories on Supreme Court verdicts, why Gandhis cannot lead opposition and more

• World’s deadliest inventor: Mikhail Kalashnikov and his AK-47. Richard Gunderman writes in The Conversation.

• Things about cricket you enjoy when no one's looking, writes Deivarayan Muthu in Cricinfo's Cricket Monthly. "There are some aspects of the game you can only enjoy in secret," he says.

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