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Last Updated Tuesday February 19 2019 11:37 PM IST
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Why this doctor's letter to his child is going viral

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Why this Kerala doctor's letter to his child is going viral Dr Roshan Radhakrishnan

We Indians are a predictable lot. An engineers son is expected to grow up into an engineer; a doctors kid is by peer pressure pushed into the same profession. The same holds good for kids of police men and IAS officers. Why we even have kids of actors and directors following their parents footsteps.

In Kerala, this is the norm. You are an aberration if you fail to adhere to this norm.

Dr Roshan Radhakrishnan, an anaesthesiologist in Kerala, wrote on his blog that he would be happy if his child chooses any profession than his. Shocked? His blog offers a stark insight into the life of a doctor in India.

His blog post titled Why I will never allow my child to become a doctor in India is going viral online.

He meticulously lists down the reasons that made him reach this conclusion and then some more on what being a doctor in India is all about. These are some of the points he makes.

You are forced to go to the India that India forgot, the most rural crevices and cul-de-sacs where healthcare is actually needed.

You are asked to bang on doors and seek out the ailing.

You are asked to bring as many of them as you can back with you.

And then you operate on them all for the handsome fees provided by the government (Rs 650/- is given to most hospitals, I hear, though I will gladly accept any revised figure too.)

The government cuts its costs by making you do Rs 60,000 surgeries for 600, citing rural service (which naturally does not apply to engineers and lawyers - because these areas don't need them at all.)

The doctor carries the moral responsibility of helping as many patients as possible and so is asked to do work well beyond his physical and mental capacity.

Generic pharmaceutical companies will pawn off their goods made in unsterile conditions at a lesser rate.

When things go bad, the crowd will calmly ignore the government and pharmacy that cut corners for a profit and be at the doctor's doorstep with stakes and pitchforks. And celebrities will be there to tut-tut on national television about how doctors are corrupt and cutting off organs for their own profits.

It is the clarity with which he lists the reasons that make his post an instant hit on social media.

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