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Last Updated Tuesday January 23 2018 03:19 PM IST

Stephen Hawking's PhD thesis a hit online, gets over 2 million views in days

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Stephen Hawking Stephen Hawking speaks during the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Paralympics at the Olympic Stadium in August, 2012 in London. Getty Images

London: Renowned British physicist Stephen Hawking's PhD thesis has been accessed more than two million times from across the world within days of it being made available to the public, according to media reports.

Hawking's 1966 work - which was released on Cambridge University's website last week - proved to be so popular that it crashed the publications section of the site on the first day.

More than 500,000 people have also tried to download the paper, titled "Properties of expanding universes".

"This is far and away the most accessed item we have in the university's Apollo repository," said Arthur Smith, from Cambridge University in the UK

Hawking wrote the 134-page document as a 24-year-old postgraduate student while studying at Cambridge.

The astrophysicist, who has been at Cambridge University since 1962, is the author of 'A Brief History of Time' - one of the most influential scientific works.

Since it went live last week, the PhD thesis has been accessed about two million times by about 800,000 unique browsers "from every corner of the globe", the 'BBC News' reported.

The next most read PhD thesis has received just 7,960 downloads in 2017.

Previously, to read Hawking's PhD in full, people had to pay 65 pounds to the university library to scan a copy or go to the library to read it.

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The opinions expressed here do not reflect those of Malayala Manorama. Legal action under the IT Act will be taken against those making derogatory and obscene statements.

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