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Last Updated Thursday January 18 2018 09:30 AM IST

ISIS claims Las Vegas shooting that killed at least 58 people

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Las Vegas police investigate reports of shooter near casino People run from the Route 91 Harvest country music festival after apparent gun fire was heard in Las Vegas, Nevada, Sunday. Photo: Getty Images

Las Vegas: A 64-year-old man armed with more than 10 rifles rained down gunfire on a Las Vegas country music festival on Sunday, slaughtering at least 58 people in the largest mass shooting in US history before killing himself.

The barrage from a 32nd-floor window in the Mandalay Bay hotel into a crowd of 22,000 people lasted several minutes, causing panic. Some fleeing fans trampled each other as police scrambled to find the gunman. More than 500 people were injured.

On Monday, police identified the gunman as Stephen Paddock, who lived in a retirement community in Mesquite, Nevada, and said they had no sense of what prompted his attack. The Islamic State militant group claimed responsibility for the massacre, but US officials expressed skepticism of that claim.

Las Vegas shooting: 2 people killed, 24 injured People run for cover at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival after apparent gun fire was heard in Las Vegas, Nevada, Sunday. Reuters

The preliminary death toll, which officials said could rise, eclipsed last year's massacre of 49 people at an Orlando night club by a gunman who pledged allegiance to Islamic State militants.

Shocked concertgoers, some with blood on their clothing, wandered streets, where the flashing lights of the city's gaudy casinos blended with those of emergency vehicles.

Police said they had no information about Paddock's motive, that he had no criminal record and was not believed to be connected to any militant group. Paddock killed himself before police entered the hotel room he was firing from, Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo told reporters.

"We have no idea what his belief system was," Lombardo said. "I can't get into the mind of a psychopath."

  • Terror Strikes Las Vegas

    People run for cover at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival after a gunman opened fire at a crowd in Las Vegas, leaving more than 50 dead on Sunday. Photo: Getty Images

    Terror Strikes Las Vegas
  • Terror Strikes Las Vegas

    Thousands of panicked people fled the scene, in some cases trampling one another as law enforcement officers scrambled to locate and kill the gunman. Photo: Getty Images

    Terror Strikes Las Vegas
  • Terror Strikes Las Vegas

    People scramble for cover at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival ground after gunman opens fire at crowd in Las Vegas. Photo: Getty Images

    Terror Strikes Las Vegas
  • Terror Strikes Las Vegas

    Police officers rushed to the spot after mass shooting at the country music festival, Las Vegas. Photo: Getty Images

    Terror Strikes Las Vegas
  • Terror Strikes Las Vegas

    Police officers stop a man who drove down Tropicana Ave. near Las Vegas Boulevard, which was closed after the mass shooting at the country music festival. Photo: Getty Images

    Terror Strikes Las Vegas
  • Terror Strikes Las Vegas

    Police officers frisk the man who drove down Tropicana Ave. near Las Vegas Boulevard. Photo: Getty Images

    Terror Strikes Las Vegas
  • Terror Strikes Las Vegas

    Shocked concertgoers, some with blood on their clothes, wandered the streets after the attack. Photo: Getty Images

    Terror Strikes Las Vegas
  • Terror Strikes Las Vegas

    The death toll of over 50, which the police emphasized was preliminary and tentative, would make the attack the deadliest mass shooting in US history. Photo: Getty Images

    Terror Strikes Las Vegas

Federal officials said there was no evidence to link Paddock to international militant groups.

"We have determined to this point no connection with an international terrorist group," FBI special agent in charge Aaron Rouse told reporters.

US officials discounted a claim of responsibility for the attack made by the Islamic State, through its Amaq news agency.

"The Intelligence Community is aware of the claim of responsibility by a foreign terrorist organization for the shooting in Las Vegas," CIA spokesman Jonathan Liu said in an email. "We advise caution on jumping to conclusions before the facts are in."

One US official said there was reason to believe that Paddock had a history of psychological problems.

Several weapons

Lombardo said there were more than 10 rifles in the room where Paddock killed himself. He had checked into the hotel on Thursday.

The police found several more weapons at Paddock's home in Mesquite, about 90 miles (145 km) northeast of Las Vegas, Mesquite police spokesman Quinn Averett told reporters.

Nevada has some of the most permissive gun laws in the United States. It does not require firearm owners to obtain licenses or register their guns.

The dead included one off-duty police officer, Lombardo said.

"He brutally murdered more than 50 people and wounded hundreds more. It was an act of pure evil," U.S. President Donald Trump said in a White House address. He ordered flags lowered to half-staff in a national gesture of mourning and said he would visit Las Vegas on Wednesday.

Leaders from around the world expressed shock and sadness at the news.

'Just kept going on'

Video of the attack showed panicked crowds fleeing as sustained rapid gunfire ripped through the area.

"People were just dropping to the ground. It just kept going on," said Steve Smith, a 45-year-old visitor from Phoenix, Arizona. He said the gunfire went on for an extended period of time.

"Probably 100 shots at a time," Smith said. "It would sound like it was reloading and then it would go again."

Las Vegas's casinos, nightclubs and shopping draw some 3.5 million visitors from around the world each year and the area was packed with visitors when the shooting broke out shortly after 10 p.m. local time (0400 GMT).

Mike McGarry, a financial adviser from Philadelphia, was at the concert when he heard hundreds of shots ring out.

"It was crazy - I laid on top of the kids. They're 20. I'm 53. I lived a good life," McGarry said. The back of his shirt bore footmarks, after people ran over him in the panicked crowd.

The shooting broke out on the final night of the three-day Route 91 Harvest festival, a sold-out event featuring top acts such as Eric Church, Sam Hunt and Jason Aldean.

'We're horrified'

The suspected shooter's brother, Eric Paddock, said the family was stunned.

"We have no idea. We're horrified. We're bewildered and our condolences go out to the victims," Eric Paddock said in a phone interview, his voice trembling. "We have no idea in the world."

As with previous US mass shootings, the incident sparked anger among advocates for gun control. The Second Amendment of the US Constitution protects the right to bear arms, and gun-rights advocates staunchly defend that provision.

"It's time for Congress to get off its ass and do something," said US senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut, where 26 young children and educators were killed in an attack on a school in 2012.

Efforts to pass federal legislation after that attack failed. Gun rights advocates argued that restrictions on legal gun sales would leave law-abiding citizens more vulnerable to attacks by criminals.

Read more: Latest world news | Two women plead not guilty to killing Kim Jong Nam

The opinions expressed here do not reflect those of Malayala Manorama. Legal action under the IT Act will be taken against those making derogatory and obscene statements.

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